The Southwest Clean Air Agency (SWCAA) is responsible for enforcing federal, state and local outdoor air quality standards and regulations in Clark, Cowlitz, Lewis, Skamania and Wahkiakum counties of southwest Washington state. Our mission is to preserve and enhance air quality in southwest Washington.

BURN BAN STATUS  
(Outdoor burning is permanently banned in all urban growth areas)
Clark County  No Burn Ban is in Effect   More Info 
Cowlitz County  No Burn Ban is in Effect   More Info 
Lewis County  No Burn Ban is in Effect   More Info 
Skamania County  No Burn Ban is in Effect   More Info 
Wahkiakum County  No Burn Ban is in Effect   More Info 

SWCAA NEWS

Free Leaf Disposal Coupons

Monday, October 13, 2014 - You can tell fall is in the air with the crisp mornings and cold evenings. This means the leaves are turning and starting to fall into our yards, streets and coating our neighborhoods. There are options for air friendly and healthy ways to dispose of those pesky leaves and other fall yard clean-up debris.

You can put leaves and yard debris in your recycle bin for pick up, chip it or compost it. If you have curbside recycling service in your neighborhood and have not signed up; now is the time. If you do not have curbside service, consider easy backyard composting, or haul the debris to your nearest recycling facility.

To help residents take care of the fallen leaves, the City of Vancouver is again offering Fall Leaf Coupons. Vancouver and Clark County Residents can redeem the free leaf disposal coupons beginning October 1 through December 20. Please note that this coupon is for LEAVES ONLY.

Get your coupon by clicking here


Call today to have your coupon mailed out; or stop by and pick one up at SWCAAs office. We are conveniently located close to H & H Wood Recyclers who is participating in this program.

Remember no matter what option you choose, there are two things to keep in mind: (1) it is illegal to smoke out your neighbors, and (2) outdoor burning is permanently banned in urbanized areas (incorporated cities, suburbs and adjacent areas) throughout our region. If in doubt, call SWCAA at 360-574-3058 x 110.


CLEAN AIR TIPS

Winterize Your Yard

Wednesday, October 01, 2014 - Even though our summer weather is lingering this year, fall is in the air. Make the most of the final days of sunshine to prepare your yard for winter.

Mow the lawn until the first frost.
And rake up clippings - this keeps roots from being smothered over the winter.


Trim perennial flowers (such as black-eyed Susans, daylilies, or peonies).
Leave a one-inch stem to save the roots for next year; also rake leaves from flower beds, so they do not rot and attract unwanted bugs.


Click to read more tips for winterizing your yard. Read More...

Are You Using Seasoned Firewood?

Monday, September 01, 2014 - Did you know that freshly chopped firewood has up to 50% water content and won't burn in your fireplace? You must let the firewood season for at least 6 months, which allows the moisture to escape. When the wood gets below 20% water content, it is ready to burn. Do not burn unseasoned (green) or even partially seasoned wood in your wood stove or fireplace as this will create lots of smoke and cause creosote build-up in your chimney which could lead to a chimney fire.

Here are 7 helpful tips for ensuring you are using Seasoned Firewood:

Cut the wood to the right length: The wood you purchased or cut yourself should fit easily in your wood stove or fireplace. It should be about three inches shorter than the firebox width or length.

Split your wood before stacking it: After you determine the proper length, split the wood so it is the right width. This is usually no more than six inches in diameter. Splitting the wood in advance of stacking it increases exposure to air, which improves the drying process.

Check the moisture content: After splitting the firewood, use a moisture meter to check the starting moisture content. The goal is 20 percent moisture content.

Stack your wood in alternate directions: This spacing allows for better air circulation and further reduces moisture content.

Store your firewood off the ground: Build a wood shed or a structure to keep firewood six inches or more off the ground. This will help protect the bottom of the wood pile from moisture.

Cover the top, but leave the sides exposed: The best option is to build a structure that has a roof. You can use a tarp to cover the top of the woodpile. When using a tarp be careful not to have the tarp hang over the sides so moisture is trapped. In warm summer months, you might want to remove the tarp to speed up the drying process.

Store the wood for at least six months: It is hard to wait, but the best way to know you are burning dry wood (short of a moisture meter) is to not burn it for at least six months.



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